Category Archives: Acupressure

An Ancient Chinese Practice Is Proving As Effective As Pre-Surgery Sedatives In Reducing Stress Levels In Child Patients Undergoing Anesthesia

During recent tests, doctors placed small plastic acupressure beads, encased in an adhesive pad, on the Extra-1 acupoint between the eyebrows of a test group of children prior to surgery. The effects were dramatic, lowering stress and allowing the patients to avoid the nausea and prolonged effects from anesthesia that the sedatives can cause.

The patients whose beads were placed on the Extra-1 point showed a significant decrease in stress levels as compared to no noticeable difference in a control group that had the beads placed on a spot above the left eyebrow, not known as an acupressure spot.

The successful use of the beads to reduce stress is in keeping with the kind of treatment that one anesthesiologist says can help to make recovery times shorter.

Dr. Armen Ketchedjian, author of the book Will it Hurt? A Parent’s Practical Guide to Children’s Surgery, says that pre-surgery anxiety has a negative effect on a child’s body and how it recovers from the stresses of surgery.

“It’s been shown that children that have lower stress levels prior to surgery have better outcomes,” says Dr. Ketch, as his patients call him. “It’s absolutely critical that parents contribute to this process by finding ways put their kids at ease.”

In his book, Dr. Ketch emphasizes the use of soothing words and honest communication as part of the overall effort to keep children calm. Efforts that can include acupressure beads or regular sedatives.

“One of the most important factors is the parent. If the parents are stressed, the child is going to mirror that,” says Dr. Ketch. “Parents can do their child a great service by learning what they can about the surgery so that their own fears are alleviated.”

Dr. Ketch hopes that his book will contribute to increased attempts by surgeons and other caretakers to reduce stress in pre-surgical patients. His advice includes:

¤ Accompany your child into the operating room if allowed
¤ Taking advantage of any specially designed waiting room that has a fish tank or toys for your child
¤ Making sure your child is well rested and has followed the surgeon’s pre-surgery instructions to the letter
¤ Bringing games or stuffed animals to the hospital to help your child feel more at home

“Children are better off the more relaxed they are. Anything that can be done to help them relax is a step in the right direction, and I encourage parents to ask their doctors about the day of the surgery and what can be done to provide for their child’s state of mind,” says Dr. Ketch.

Will it Hurt? helps educate parents about pediatric surgery. It is an easy-to-read resource that will give you, your child and your family the help and reassurance you need to make the surgical experience as stress-free as possible.

Listed in The Guide to America’s Top Anesthesiologists by the Consumer Research Council of America, Dr. Ketch trained at Cornell Medical Center, with a fellowship at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and a pain management elective at Boston Children’s Hospital. He has also worked to help develop new techniques in ambulatory anesthesia, taught medical students and residents, and cared for more than 10,000 patients.

Dr. Ketch is also the author of the children’s book Golden Apples (winner of the 2008 Reviewer’s Choice Award), a beautifully illustrated book that aims to help educate children about the dangers of drug abuse.

For more information, contact the author directly at support@dr.ketch.com.

WARREN ENTERPRISES, LLC and author Dr. Armen G. Ketchedjian chose Arbor Books, Inc. (www.ArborBooks.com) to design and promote Will It Hurt? A Parent’s Practical Guide to Children’s Surgery. Arbor Books is an internationally renowned, full-service book design, ghostwriting and marketing firm.

(Will It Hurt? Parent’s Practical Guide to Children’s Surgery by Dr. Ketch; ISBN: 0-9815373-0-8; $14.95; 172 pages; 5½” x 8 ½”; soft cover book with illustrations; WARREN ENTERPRISES, LLC)

Via EPR Network
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The Do-It-Yourself Acupressure Face Lift Guide Explains What Is Facial Acupressure And How Facial Acupressure Works

The Chinese have used acupressure to enhance physical fitness and beauty for thousands of years. This 5,000 year old system has been found effective for toning muscles, improving the condition and “luster” of skin, relieving acne, sinus problems, jaw tension, and headaches.

It’s amazing to learn that many of the points that are used for these common complaints have Chinese names that reveal their other benefits, such as the Facial Beauty point and the Heavenly Appearance point.

As a finger pressure technique, facial acupressure can be used as a facial massage technique. Simple finger pressure relieves congested areas as well as relaxes the muscles. Thus toxins are released and eliminated, which of course benefits our outward appearance.

To explain this simple and healthy technique to women, Anne wrote a guide, the Do-it-yourself Acupressure Face Lift. The guide teaches quick and easy exercises and explains how to use facial acupressure to improve the skin complexion and maintain a youthful look.

Anne insists on the fact that facial acupressure is a finger pressure technique and revives the skin without any chemical. Facial acupressure helps preserve the face with a simple daily practice. These quick and easy finger pressure exercises act to firm up the facial muscles, reduce the fine lines, and finally improve the skin complexion. Moreover, facial acupressure brings other benefits: it helps getting rid of acne, skin problems, headaches and sinusitis.

Eastern tradition describes the world in terms of energy. Energy is the elementary substance and vital life force. It is also a synonym of “breath”. The Qi evokes breath, movement and vital energy. It encompasses two complimentary aspects: the Yin and the Yang. Without energy, there is no life.

The Qi goes way beyond simple muscular energy. It encompasses all the energies a body can pull: physical, mental, physiological and psychological. This flow is called Qi or Ch’i in Chinese, as in Tai Chi Chuan. It is called Ki in Japanese, as in Aikido, and Prana in India.

Acupuncture is a traditional Chinese medical technique for unblocking chi or qi. And the acupressure points are the famous acupuncture points, or acupoints (called “tsubos” in Japanese). They are the gateways to the Qi, and to the whole energy system. To work on the acupoints, acupuncture uses needles while acupressure uses gentle to firm finger pressure.

Many acupressure meridians run across the face, neck and skull. By massaging the points linked to the Qi, acupressure accesses the deeper levels and works on the general well-being, which in turn reflects on the face (everybody has noticed how a person in love looks radiant no matter what!). This vital energy is the most important element of the Facelift Acupressure; it governs our health, how we feel and how we look.

Anne Cossé is a Certified Acupressure Practitioner by the State of California. She is trained in traditional Shiatsu, Zen Shiatsu, Jin Shin Do, Reflexology, Touch for Health, and Reiki.

Anne Cossé’s website for workshops: http://www.acupressurewellness.com/
Anne Cossé’s website for the Facial Acupressure Guide: http://www.faceliftaunaturel.com/

Via EPR Network

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