Tag Archives: drug development

Dr. Christina Marrongelli chosen by the World Congress on Pharmacology & Chemistry of Natural Compounds to moderate their 2018 conference in Paris

Dr. Christina Marrongelli chosen by the World Congress on Pharmacology & Chemistry of Natural Compounds to moderate their 2018 conference in Paris

Marrongelli selected for her expertise in Botanical Drug Development

LONDON, Jun-16-2018 — /EPR Healthcare News/ — As a leading expert in her field, Dr. Christina Marrongelli, PharmD has been chosen by the World Congress on Pharmacology & Chemistry of Natural Compounds to moderate their 2018 conference: Exploring New Trends & Innovations in Pharmacology and Natural Compounds. The conference is being held in Paris, France on June 18, 2018.

Dr. Marrongelli, who is an adjunct professor at the Medical University of South Carolina in the department of drug discovery and biomedical sciences will also present “Developing and Marketing Botanical Drugs in the United States”.

The United States, which has the largest pharmaceutical market in the world, demonstrates a strong demand for the use of botanicals as medicine. However, to date only two prescription botanical drugs are currently approved for use in the USA: Veregen® (sinecatechins) and Mytesi™ (crofelemer).

Marrongelli attributes this disconnect between supply and demand to hidden barriers. She notes that with the worldwide herbal drug market is expected to reach nearly $86.74 billion by 2022, businesses must identify and address these barriers so that heterogeneous botanical drug products can obtain the approvals necessary to meet the consumers growing expectations and demands for botanical medicines.

To further explain the barriers to regulation of botanicals, Marrongelli points to the Botanical Drug Development Guidance for Industry from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Food and Drug Administration Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) that was last updated in 2016. According to publication, regulation of botanicals in the U.S. is different from regulation in the rest of world. The U.S. does not have a separate regulatory category for traditional or herbal medicines: A botanical product may be classified as a food (including a dietary supplement), drug (including a biological drug), medical device, or cosmetic under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act). Whether an article is a food, drug, medical device, or cosmetic depends in large part on its intended use.

To learn more about the issues and barriers to the development of botanical drugs, please contact Dr. Marrongelli at Marronge@musc.edu or DrM@pharmD.expert.

SOURCE: EuropaWire

‘Drugging the Undruggable’ Symposium Highlights Advances in Treating Cancer, Diabetes and Other Major Diseases

Scientists from government, industry, and academia presenting at the 240th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society released a new report highlighting advances in creating the next generation of medicines for treating cancer, diabetes, and other major diseases. The report, which was featured during the special symposium, “Drugging the Undruggable,” summarized progress in drug development for diseases that were once considered “untouchable.” These treatments specifically targeted conditions where previous efforts to develop a drug therapyhad failed.

However, after decades of a seemingly impossible search, scientists appear to be making a breakthrough in the area of drug development to treat cancers and other diseases. As Science Daily noted in their coverage of the report and symposium, scientists have identified “stapled peptides,” a new family of potential drugs capable of blocking a key protein that’s involved in the development of cancer.

Global Health Progress (GHP) supports symposium presenters’ statements regarding the importance of these type of drug developments. For instance, Gregory Verdine, a chemical biologist at Harvard University, explained:

“The entire pharmaceutical industry has been working on drug-design platforms that focus on this little sliver of human drug targets and this limits the drug arsenal available to doctors. What’s required is an entirely new class of drugs that overcome the shortcomings of drugs of the past.” Innovative research and development (R&D) of new drugs is critical in improving overall healthcare, combating epidemics and fighting diseases. Drug development is just one way research-based biopharmaceutical companies serve as active partners in some of the largest and boldest health initiatives that explore new and effective ways to provide treatment, care and education to millions of people both domestically and internationally.

Via EPR Network
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